welcome to kitkat's highly unnecessary

Jul 29
shaniaaa-xo:

born—misunderstood:

That’s cold
Jul 29

I can't do this anymore. →

curiousplantkin:

Yes, everybody. This is /clearly/ a troll blog. I created it because I saw screencaps of squirrrelygirly on facebook and, after checking out her blog, knew she was trolling. I thought it seemed like fun and decided to give it a try.

It started out as fun at first. But, despite not reflecting my…

Jul 29

all-that-is-pokemon:

So i decided to try to hatch a shiny Phantump just right now and literally the first egg i hatched was a shiny!! I feel like laughing so hard and i don’t even know why

Jul 29

derselala:

nadeki:

noobling:

person: Pokemon is such a childish game, why are you playing it?

me: 

me: 

me: image

ARE YOU KIDDING ME

image

Jul 29

fukaml:

IMM LITERALLY IN TEARS SKIP TO 58 SECON DS PLEASE IM BEGGING YOU

Jul 29

theamazingindi:

listen, i don’t know about you, but the only people I know who actually enjoy the smell of axe body spray are not women. it’s dudes. it’s all dudes. i have worn axe body spray and walked into a room and have been complimented by legions of dudes. axe body spray is an agent of the gay agenda to make men smell better for other men to unlock their latent homosexuality and there is no stopping them now, we’re in too deep and it’s far too late.

Jul 28

Japanese honorifics

  • -San: is the most common honorific and is equivalent to Mr., Miss, Ms. or Mrs. It is the all-purpose honorific and can be used in any situation were politeness is required
  • -Sama: is one level higher than "-san" and is used to confer great respect
  • -Dono: this one comes from the word "tono" which means "lord". It is an even higher level than "-sama" and confers utmost respect
  • -Kun: suffix used at the end of boys' names to express familiarity or endearment. It is also sometimes used by men among friends, or when addressing someone younger or of a lower station
  • -Chan: is used to express endearment, mostly towards girls. It is also used for little boys, pets, and even among lovers. It gives a sense of childish cuteness
  • Bozu: informal way to refer to a boy similar to the English terms of "kid" or "squirt"
  • Senpai: title which suggests that the addressee is one's senior in a group or organization. It is most often used in a school setting, where underclassmen refers to their upperclassmen as "senpai". It can also be used in the workplace, such as when a newer employee addresses an employee who has seniority in the company
  • Kohai: is the opposite of "senpai" and is used towards underclassmen in school or newcomers in the workplace. It connotes that the addressee is of a lower station
  • Sensei: literally meaning "one who has come before", this title is used for teachers, doctors, or masters of any profession or art
  • -[Blank]: is usually forgotten in these lists, but it is perhaps the most significant difference between Japanese and English. The lack of honorific means that the speaker has permission to address the person in a very intimate way. Usually only family, spouses, or very close friends have this kind of permission. Known as yobisute, it can be gratifying when someone who has earned the intimacy starts to call one by one's name without the honorific. But when that intimacy hasn't been earned, it can be very insulting.
Jul 28
watwotwut:

OMG YES

watwotwut:

OMG YES

Jul 28
Jul 28

hoenntrumpets:

this has been the scariest night of the I Fucking Hate Skeletons groups life